If Not Us Then Who: Building a Permanent Fund for Haiti Through the Mobilization of Haiti’s Resources-The Diaspora

If Not Us Then Who: Building a Permanent Fund for Haiti Through the Mobilization of Haiti’s Resources-The Diaspora

Building on an asset framing model that promotes the strengths and resources of Haiti, Ayiti Community Trust (ACT) has long recognized the significant role that Haitians living outside of the country can play in the development of the country. As a community foundation building a permanent fund to support grassroots organizations in the areas of Civic Education, Entrepreneurship, and Environment, the founders and board of governance sought to unite Haitians throughout the glove in recognizing the vital role that we can play as a collective in the future of the country.

The recent article in Politico by Joel Dreyfuss confirmed what we knew all along. The children of Ayiti (Haiti) living outside of the country must play a significant role in the country's future development. Over the past five years, we remained laser focus on building relationships and partnerships with Haitian organizations and individuals in the US, Canada, and other parts of the globe. Despite the urgency we knew existed to act expeditiously, we recognized that this might be a slow process due to the trauma and many ways that Haitians in the diaspora have been betrayed by projects that often lead to no results. We knew that this would be a marathon, not a sprint, and we geared up for the journey ahead. We believe that a permanent fund using an endowment model can be created by Haitians for Haiti. We saw an example of that when, upon hearing about the fund we were creating for the country, a 65-year-old Haitian woman wrote a $60.00 check which served as the first check deposited into the fund account at the Miami Foundation (where the fund is being invested).

We aim to reach an initial 20 million dollars in the endowment in 5 years, yield about 1 million dollars in perpetuity, supporting grassroots organizations in the outskirts of the capitals. We know that such a goal is reachable with Haitians and friends of Haiti united in legacy to create something for the country that will exist for generations to come!

By Guerda Nicolas, PhD; President of Ayiti Community Trust

Our Beloved Haiti by Elizabeth Louis

Our Beloved Haiti by Elizabeth Louis

Our beloved Haiti continues to be in a pruning season where the mass is courageously attempting to purge out unacceptable political, dire livelihood circumstances, and violent across regions and sectors. The people of Haiti depase fatige, yo bouke (are beyond fatigued, they are tired of being tired)! The elements of the current times have been brooding for many decades and are reaching tipping points that have never been experienced or witnessed before in our homeland. The responses and cries cut through generations that are desperate for this relentless period to be over, where people’s voices are affirmed, their human rights are honored, their concerns are listened to, and their holistic well-being of social, psychological, community, and Haitian identity are fully supported and validated.

The call for peace in all forms is not just the absence of violence and insecurity but truly a peace that attends to the needs of the people, that edify the souls of the people, and pay homage to our forefathers and foremothers who sacrificed for the birth of this nation to be free and liberated, by living productive and responsible lives that practices the Haitian

values of unity, strength, hope and faith. Collectively, these values and the ideals we have for our country cannot remain as desired dreams but must traverse the compounded challenges of our reality. As Haitians in Haiti and across the diaspora, what will it take for us to be one with each other to combat forms of injustices and let our spirits guide us in restructuring a society that upholds our narratives and vision for a Haiti that is representative of what we envision; rooted in the voices of the people, with the trunk of our Ayisyen identity, branched on the intentional efforts of today, and the leaves that flow our progress.

 

Our Beloved Ayiti (Haiti) by Elizabeth Louis

Our beloved Ayiti continues to be in a pruning season where the mass is courageously attempting to purge out unacceptable political, dire livelihood circumstances, and violent across regions and sectors. The people of Ayiti depase fatige, yo bouke (are beyond fatigued, they are tired of being tired)! The elements of the current times have been brooding for many decades and are reaching tipping points that have never been experienced or witnessed before in our homeland. The responses and cries cut through generations that are desperate for this relentless period to be over, where people’s voices are affirmed, their human rights are honored, their concerns are listened to, and their holistic well-being of social, psychological, community, and Ayitian (Haitian) identity are fully supported and validated.

The call for peace in all forms is not just the absence of violence and insecurity but truly a peace that attends to the needs of the people, that edify the souls of the people, and pay homage to our forefathers and foremothers who sacrificed for the birth of this nation to be free and liberated, by living productive and responsible lives that practice Ayitian values such as: unity, strength, hope and faith. Collectively, these values and the ideals we have for our country cannot remain as desired dreams but must traverse the compounded challenges of our reality. As Ayitians in Ayiti and across the globe, what will it take for us to be one with each other to combat these forms of injustices? When might we let our spirits guide us in restructuring a society that is of our own creation and making? A nation that is rooted in its value for life, liberty, and togetherness. A nation tall and unwavering as is the trunk of Ayitian legacy. A nation whose influence branches over the span of the globe as is creates shade and refuge for the meek. A nation who cycles its leaves and flowers as a constant reminder that we must undergo seasons of pruning and of blooming. A nation of justice.

Cultural Philanthropy: Haitians Join in Philanthropy for Ayiti

Cultural Philanthropy: Haitians Join in Philanthropy for Ayiti

Yes, Haitians are philanthropists too! This was my response to a person recently who was surprised when I was talking about how we at Ayiti Community Trust are mobilizing Haitians throughout the globe to build an endowment fund for the country. This tells me that people may not see us as philanthropists. From my experience, Haitians are one of the most philanthropic groups that I know. However, our philanthropy looks different and more culturally congruent. There is a difference between creating a culture of philanthropy and cultural philanthropy. The words cultural philanthropy often evokes a focus on philanthropy that focused on arts and culture. What I mean by cultural philanthropy is how different cultural groups are engaging in philanthropy to promote

development in their countries. The word philanthropy is often associated with White and high-income individuals. We rarely pay attention to how different ethnic and cultural groups engage in philanthropy to promote development in their communities and countries. For example, a couple of years ago, we had a plantain farmer who offered us some of the regime plantains as his contributions to the fund. When he sold these sets of plantains, he gave us the money. This is a true example of cultural philanthropy that we must acknowledge and celebrate.

To promote the role that Haitians are playing in philanthropy, this year, during Haitian Heritage month, one of the most visible celebrations of Haitian heritage and cultures across the globe, Ayiti Community Trust launched Haitian Heritage month fundraising campaign with a $10, 000 goal. We sought to celebrate our culture while also show ways that Haitians are engaging in philanthropy. As a result, we had over 50 people join in the fundraising campaign throughout the US and Canada, and we exceed our goal!!

So the message is clear. Let's broaden our perspectives about philanthropy to shine a light on the various ways that different ethnic groups are engaging in philanthropy. We are starting the discussion with our experience with Haitians. Yes, Haitians are philanthropists!

By Guerda Nicolas, PhD; President of Ayiti Community Trust

Edikasyon Sivik se yon potomitan nan devlopman dirab

Edikasyon Sivik se yon potomitan nan devlopman dirab

Si nou chèche konprann byen, sivis vle di

respè, atachman ak devouman sitwayen genyen pou moun ki ap viv ansanm menm kote avèk yo, respè nan sa yo kwè ansanm ak respè pou lalwa. Ansanm règ sa yo ki ekri oswa ki pa ekri, jan pou moun viv nan yon sosyete, ki gen pou devwa mete regleman nan lavi popilasyon

an epi fasilite lavi kominote a. Ki vle di, se yon politik ki nesesè, pafwa li obligatwa, pou tout sitwayen ki ap viv nan yon kominote, pou kominote a kapab mache kòrekteman.

Potomitan pou devlopman dirab an Ayiti, Edikasyon

Sivik ap pèmèt sitwayen yo pran konsyans nan fon kè yo, konprann, respekte, epi simaye valè solidarite, tankou renmen frè ak sè, respekte lòt epi reskonsab tèt yo.

Ayiti Community Trust, rive konprann pou chanje

Ayiti, nou dwe mete piplis aksan sou jan nou ap montre sitwayen yo konprann kilès yo ye epi bay kilti nou piplis jarèt pandan nou ap kontinye pale de: Idantite, Dwa ak Devwa, Sekirite, Libète, Jistis, Leta ak Demokrasi.

 

Patisipasyon ou ap pèmèt reyalize misyon nou

ki se potekole nan pwojè tankou Lakou Kajou. ACT ap òganize tou nan mwa oktòb ki a ap vini an, nan vil OKAP, yon gwo woumble sou edikasyon sivik, kote plis pase 20 òganizasyon ki ap travay nan domèn nan pral ap patisipe.